Sunday, 19 May 2013

Importance of Milk for good health

  1. The vitamin A present in cow’s milk is necessary for the growth and development of epithelial and mucosal tissue. These tissues protect the body against toxins and invading organisms.
  2.  It is a good source of iodine (a mineral essential for thyroid function) and riboflavin & vitamin B12; two vitamins that are necessary for cardiovascular health.
  3. It is rich in calcium & potassium and prevents formation of kidney stones in the body. 
  4. Carbohydrates. The carbohydrate in all Milks is lactose or Milk sugar (4-5%).
  5. Fats. Fats contain 3.5% to 4% of fats in emulsified form. Milk fat is a good source of Vitamins A and D when Milk is allowed to stand for sometime, fat rises to the surface as cream, Chemically, milk fat consists of some vital fatty acids.
  6. Cow Milk contains 3.2% of proteins; 4.4% of Lactose, 4.1% of Fats; and 87.5% of water.
  7. Goat Milk contains 3.5% of Protein, 4.6% of Lactose, 4.5% of Fats and 86.5% of water. 
  8. Human milk contains 1.1% of protein; 7.4% of Lactose; 3.4% of Fats and 88.0% of water.


Click Here!

Fat: how important it is?

Fat:

Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and generally insoluble in water. Chemically, fats are triglycerides: triesters of glycerol and any of several fatty acids. Fats may be either solid or liquid at room temperature, depending on their structure and composition. Although the words "oils", "fats", and "lipids" are all used to refer to fats, in reality, fat is a subset of lipid."Oils" is usually used to refer to fats that are liquids at normal room temperature, while "fats" is usually used to refer to fats that are solids at normal room temperature. "Lipids" is used to refer to both liquid and solid fats, along with other related substances, usually in a medical or biochemical context. The word "oil" is also used for any substance that does not mix with water and has a greasy feel, such as petroleum (or crude oil), heating oil, and essential oils, regardless of its chemical structure.

Importance for living organisms

  1. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, meaning they can only be digested, absorbed, and transported in conjunction with fats. Fats are also sources of essential fatty acids, an important dietary requirement.
  2. Fats play a vital role in maintaining healthy skin and hair, insulating body organs against shock, maintaining body temperature, and promoting healthy cell function.
  3. Fats also serve as energy stores for the body, containing about 37.8 kilojoules (9 calories) per gram of fat.They are broken down in the body to release glycerol and free fatty acids. The glycerol can be converted to glucose by the liver and thus used as a source of energy.
  4. Fat also serves as a useful buffer towards a host of diseases. When a particular substance, whether chemical or biotic—reaches unsafe levels in the bloodstream, the body can effectively dilute—or at least maintain equilibrium of—the offending substances by storing it in new fat tissue. This helps to protect vital organs, until such time as the offending substances can be metabolized and/or removed from the body by such means as excretion, urination, accidental or intentional bloodletting, sebum excretion, and hair growth.
  5. While it is nearly impossible to remove fat completely from the diet, it would also be unhealthy to do so. Some fatty acids are essential nutrients, meaning that they can't be produced in the body from other compounds and need to be consumed in small amounts. All other fats required by the body are non-essential and can be produced in the body from other compounds.(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat)
Click Here!

Friday, 17 May 2013

Is it okay to workout when you are sick?

When your workout routine is going great and you are not rarely missing a day, then suddenly you fall sick.
Now you are in a position what should you do? Should you skip the bench press or dumbell curls? Will it be hard to start again if you skip a day or two?
Well, the answer depends upon which disease you are suffering from, experts said that if you are suffering from common cold then its okay to workout, but if you've got a fever, going to the gym is definitely no-no.

As a general guide for exercise and illness, consider this:
  • Exercise is usually OK if your signs and symptoms are all "above the neck" — symptoms you may have with a common cold, such as runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing or minor sore throat. Consider reducing the intensity and length of your workout, though, or you may feel worse. Instead of going for a run, take a walk, for example.
  • Don't exercise if your signs and symptoms are "below the neck" — such as chest congestion, hacking cough or upset stomach.
  • Don't exercise if you have a fever, fatigue or widespread muscle aches.
Click Here!